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2016_caught_in_the_act_mars_householder
walk a mile in her shoes : the art of karen elaine spencer

by christine redfern

in:

More Caught in the Act: An Anthology of Performance Art by Canadian Women

Vol. 2, ed. by Johanna Householder and Tanya Mars  420 pp. , 264 b/w photos, 18 colour plates ISBN 978-0-920397-64-0 (softcover) Montreal and Toronto: Artexte Editions/YYZBOOKS, 2016.

to bid and for more information click on link : http://encan.esse.ca/fr/spencer-karen-elaine

Numéro de lot : 6
stars around the beautiful (extract of “If Not, Winter, Fragments of Sappho“, by Anne Carson)

Cette peinture transcrit la traduction par Anne Carson d’un fragment de poème écrit par Sappho – un fragment où il est question de la lune, des étoiles et, de manière peut-être plus évocatrice, de la position des étoiles qui acceptent de « dissimuler leur forme lumineuse ». La peinture, qui se présente comme un texte blanc sur fond noir et recourt à dessein à l’humilité du carton, rejoue la performance du fragment, la « dissimulation ». La peinture nous demande de prendre le temps de déchiffrer le texte, de lever nos yeux et de remarquer non seulement la brillance de la lune pleine, mais aussi la luminosité des étoiles.

This painting transcribes an Anne Carson translation of a fragment from a poem written by Sappho – a fragment which speaks of the moon and the stars, but perhaps most evocatively, the position the stars assume of “hiding back their luminous form” while in the presence of the full moon. Presented as white text on a black ground, deliberately employing the humble status of cardboard, the painting repeats the performance of the fragment, the “hiding back.” The painting asks us to take the time to decipher the text, to lift up our eyes and notice not only the brightness of the full moon, but also the quiet luminosity of the stars.

_MG_9655_Photo Guy LHeureux

Gesso et encre de chine sur carton
2015
33,5 x 36 cm
Valeur estimée : 2 100 $

bio
karen elaine spencer (b. 1960) maintains a studio practice, performs, curates and writes. Oscillating between work in the street, exhibitions in galleries, and projects via the web, spencer questions hierarchies and investigates how we, as transient beings, occupy the world we live in. Since obtaining her MFA from the Université du Québec à Montréal in 2001 spencer has been awarded numerous international residency programs, including the Symposium international d’art contemporain in Baie-Saint-Paul (2015), the International Studio and Curatorial program in Brooklyn (2012), the Cité Internationale des arts de Paris (2005), and the John Snow House artist in residence in Calgary (2011). 
Recent exhibitions include One Day at ELLEPHANT in Toronto (2016), letters home/lettres à ma mère, at Galerie B-312 and ELLEPHANT in Montréal and Toronto (2015), Coming to Terms at Little Berlin in Philadelphia (2015), New York Stories: Twenty Years of ISCP in Brooklyn (2014), and La moitié du monde est une femme at the Grande Bibliothèque in Montréal (2013). 
spencer’s work is held in the collections of Air Canada, the Richmond Art Gallery, the Canada Council Art Bank, the Bibliotheque nationale du Québec, the Musée d’art contemporain de Baie-Saint-Paul, la Collection Prêt d’œuvres d’art Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, the Richmond Women’s Resource Centre Association, the Art Gallery of Mount Saint Vincent University, as well as corporate and private collections in Canada and the United States. In 2012 spencer was awarded the La Centrale Powerhouse Prize and in 2016 spencer was a finalist for the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec’s prix en art actuel.

but i say it is what you love

November 11, 2016

passeport2016-9153

passeport2016-9149

2016_dare_passeport_sappho_72dpi

title: but i say
year: 2016
material: ink on paper
dimensions : 11 x 7.6 cm

photos : sarah hautcouer
stamp created for dare-dare‘s 2016 passeport

Some men say an army of horse and some men say an army on foot

and some men say an army of ships is the most beautiful thing
on the black earth. But I say it is what you love.
Anne Carson in If Not, Winter : Fragments of Sappho (2002)

“But I say it is what you love,” from a poem entitled, “Anactoria” composed by Sappho (born circa 630 B.C.) is Sappho’s rebuttal to Homer’s Iliad, an epic poem celebrating the war of Troy. Here, Sappho’s love is not an abstract ideal, but rather a tangible love directed towards one woman named Anactoria.

By placing the love of one person for another above the love of country Sappho undermines the rhetoric of war and consequently undermines the idea of borders and hence their policing. In today’s world, where ironically the island of Lesbos (where Sappho was born and lived, and the source for the word lesbian, which signifies a woman who loves other woman – like those from the reputed homosexual band associated with Sappho of Lesbos) is the location where the Syrian refugees are landing in Greece,  the poem “Anactoria” could be read as a call for a compassionate approach to borders, passports and territories.

to bid and for more information click on link : http://encan.esse.ca/fr/spencer-karen-elaine

Numéro de lot : 6
stars around the beautiful (extract of “If Not, Winter, Fragments of Sappho“, by Anne Carson)

Cette peinture transcrit la traduction par Anne Carson d’un fragment de poème écrit par Sappho – un fragment où il est question de la lune, des étoiles et, de manière peut-être plus évocatrice, de la position des étoiles qui acceptent de « dissimuler leur forme lumineuse ». La peinture, qui se présente comme un texte blanc sur fond noir et recourt à dessein à l’humilité du carton, rejoue la performance du fragment, la « dissimulation ». La peinture nous demande de prendre le temps de déchiffrer le texte, de lever nos yeux et de remarquer non seulement la brillance de la lune pleine, mais aussi la luminosité des étoiles.

This painting transcribes an Anne Carson translation of a fragment from a poem written by Sappho – a fragment which speaks of the moon and the stars, but perhaps most evocatively, the position the stars assume of “hiding back their luminous form” while in the presence of the full moon. Presented as white text on a black ground, deliberately employing the humble status of cardboard, the painting repeats the performance of the fragment, the “hiding back.” The painting asks us to take the time to decipher the text, to lift up our eyes and notice not only the brightness of the full moon, but also the quiet luminosity of the stars.

_MG_9655_Photo Guy LHeureux

Gesso et encre de chine sur carton
2015
33,5 x 36 cm
Valeur estimée : 2 100 $

bio
karen elaine spencer (b. 1960) maintains a studio practice, performs, curates and writes. Oscillating between work in the street, exhibitions in galleries, and projects via the web, spencer questions hierarchies and investigates how we, as transient beings, occupy the world we live in. Since obtaining her MFA from the Université du Québec à Montréal in 2001 spencer has been awarded numerous international residency programs, including the Symposium international d’art contemporain in Baie-Saint-Paul (2015), the International Studio and Curatorial program in Brooklyn (2012), the Cité Internationale des arts de Paris (2005), and the John Snow House artist in residence in Calgary (2011). 
Recent exhibitions include One Day at ELLEPHANT in Toronto (2016), letters home/lettres à ma mère, at Galerie B-312 and ELLEPHANT in Montréal and Toronto (2015), Coming to Terms at Little Berlin in Philadelphia (2015), New York Stories: Twenty Years of ISCP in Brooklyn (2014), and La moitié du monde est une femme at the Grande Bibliothèque in Montréal (2013). 
spencer’s work is held in the collections of Air Canada, the Richmond Art Gallery, the Canada Council Art Bank, the Bibliotheque nationale du Québec, the Musée d’art contemporain de Baie-Saint-Paul, la Collection Prêt d’œuvres d’art Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, the Richmond Women’s Resource Centre Association, the Art Gallery of Mount Saint Vincent University, as well as corporate and private collections in Canada and the United States. In 2012 spencer was awarded the La Centrale Powerhouse Prize and in 2016 spencer was a finalist for the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec’s prix en art actuel.